International Sar Agreements

The Arctic Search and Rescue Agreement is an international treaty concluded on May 12, 2011 in Nuuk, Greenland, between arctic Council member states – Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the United States. [1] The treaty coordinates international reports and responses to search and rescue (SAR) services in the Arctic and defines the area of competence of each state party. [1] Given conflicting land claims in the Arctic, the treaty provides that “the delimitation of search and rescue zones is not linked to, and does not affect, the delimitation of boundaries between states or their sovereignty, sovereignty or jurisdiction.” The Arctic Search and Rescue Agreement is the first binding agreement negotiated under the auspices of the Arctic Council. The treaty reflects the growing economic importance of the Arctic region due to its increased accessibility due to global warming. [2] [1] The Canadian government is the depositary of the treaty. It entered into force on 19 January 2013, after being ratified by each of the eight signatory States. . . .