British India Is On Lease For 99 Years. (Transfer Of Power Agreement 1947)

(iii) payments made outside India under agreements to release assets transferred to the Indian depositary of enemy property; As I said, the two principles on which the Cripps mission is based – the agreement and a period of dominion with total freedom of choice – seem to be respected, as far as I can see it in the copy of the White Paper which is now in the polling station and obtained by the courtesy of the Prime Minister I received an hour ago. I`m not sure you`re reading what I have. But I don`t see that this is a myth. Nowhere in andrestexan after the transformation in 1950 is it said that India is not a member of commonwealth rule. I see that Scripture says independent domination. This is a subject that is not clear, I think India is separate from the domination of the Commonwealth (with the exception of the agreement) and I think that India has a common legal system whose infrastructure still today has the influence of British colonial rule. This theme is not a proven myth, the 99-year lease is a definitive possibility and makes sense. I do not want to give up the Indulgence of the House, but we must finally ask ourselves from the outset whether, after the evolution of things – and my opinions are well known on this – we can find a better way to save India from the bloodshed that could be so close. I have no doubt that at first glance, and subject to the unknown factors that seem favourable, it seems that regulation along these lines could offer India some prospect of fleeing one of the most abominable disasters that have ever devastated the vast expanses of Asia. Of course, we cannot form an opinion on the very large outlines and complex details that have been given; Nor can we form firm opinions without knowing how the real facts of what is expected of them are hoped for by the government, the viceroy and other officials of India.

However, I would like to say straight away, with regard to the honourable Member`s statement on the next legislation, that if the facts correspond to the contours with which we have been presented this afternoon and, if necessary, I note that legislation 43 should be put in place in order to quickly implement the transfer of power. With regard to Dominion status, it would not be fair to different parts of India if such legislation were to be considered controversial or for long delays to come into force once put in place. That is why, although we reserve all our freedom to discuss matters of detail, we will not reject laws that would give the various parts of India the dominion status that can be presented to us on the basis of the Prime Minister`s statement this afternoon. The Prime Minister* said that the viceroy deserves great recognition. These are issues on which it is extremely difficult to form a firm opinion now, but if the hopes enshrined in this statement are confirmed, it will indeed require a lot of recognition, not only to the Viceroy, but also to the Prime Minister who advised His Majesty to appoint him. . . .